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There are languages developed specifically to express XML schemas.

The Document Type Definition (DTD) language, which is native to the XML specification, is a schema language that is of relatively limited capability, but that also has other uses in XML aside from the expression of schemas.

Unlike W3C XML Schema, RELAX NG was designed so that validation and augmentation (adding type information and default values) are separate.

W3C XML Schema has a formal mechanism for attaching a schema to an XML document, while RELAX NG intentionally avoids such mechanisms for security and interoperability reasons.

A schema is analogous to a grammar for a language; a schema defines what the vocabulary for the language may be and what a valid "sentence" is.

There are historic and current XML schema languages: The main ones (see also the ISO 19757's endorsed languages) are described below.

RELAX NG has no ability to apply default attribute data to an element's list of attributes (i.e., changing the XML info set), while W3C XML Schema does.

Again, this design is intentional and is to separate validation and augmentation.

RELAX NG and W3C XML Schema allow for similar mechanisms of specificity.

W3C XML Schema has a rich "simple type" system built in (xs:number, xs:date, etc., plus derivation of custom types), while RELAX NG has an extremely simplistic one because it's meant to use type libraries developed independently of RELAX NG, rather than grow its own. In practice it's common for a RELAX NG schema to use the predefined "simple types" and "restrictions" (pattern, max Length, etc.) of W3C XML Schema.

In W3C XML Schema a specific number or range of repetitions of patterns can be expressed whereas it's practically not possible to specify at all in RELAX NG ().

There are several different languages available for specifying an XML schema. The primary purpose of a schema language is to specify what the structure of an XML document can be.

This means which elements can reside in which other elements, which attributes are and are not legal to have on a particular element, and so forth.

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Both allow for a degree of modularity in their languages, including, for example, splitting the schema into multiple files.

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